On March 11, 2016 the Cattaraugus-Allegany Teacher Center will offer 3 free workshops to be held at Allegany-Limestone High School.  
To register click on the REGISTRATION tab on this site by Monday, March 7

ELT's ENSURING MATHEMATICAL UNDERSTANDING

ALHS Room 221, 11-3pm (Lunch provided)
Audience: k-8 teachers (limit 20)
Presenter:  Beverly Voos

Participants will learn techniques through unpacking the standards to increase mathematical understanding and assessment & questioning strategies to use in their classrooms.  We will take a deeper look at some specific standards at each grade level. Through unpacking the standards, you will identify what students need to understand, know and do.  Activities will assist teachers to focus their questions to help students engage with the mathematical practices, and also to target fundamental ideas in the major content being taught.  Presenter will also lead discussion in identifying questioning techniques to promote student thinking.

Compelling, Supporting, and Essential—So Many Questions!

ALHS Room 223, 8-11 am 
Audience:  Social Studies 6-12 teachers (limit 20)
Presenter:  John Harmon

This session will discuss ways that social studies teachers can leverage the enormous power of the skills embedded in the ELA Common Core as a tool to meet the C3 (College, Career, and Civics) framework for social studies.  We will discuss and practice Essential Questions, Compelling Questions, and Supporting Questions in order to establish a foundation for inquiry skills in the social studies classroom.

Bring a laptop or similar device to access the many handouts available on his Edmodo site. 

Topics include:

·         Common Core Literacy

·         The Three Shifts

·         C3 Framework

·         Inquiries

·         Essential Questions

·         Compelling Questions

·         Supporting Questions

 

Literacy in the Content Areas 6-12

ALHS Room 223, 12-3 pm
Audience:  MS/HS non-ELA teachers (limit 20)
Presenter:  John Harmon

Art, music, science, math (yes even math!), as well as many other secondary courses, all rely on the ability of our students to read and respond to the language of those individual disciplines.  As every discipline transitions to a twenty-first century approach to teaching and learning, we can see that the major tenets of the Common Core become increasingly more pervasive.  The recent shift in the SATs provide just one example.    This session will discuss ways that non-ELA teachers can harness the enormous power of the literacy skills embedded in the ELA Common Core as a tool to meet their own course standards.   

Bring a laptop or similar device to access the many handouts available on his Edmodo site. 

Key Topics include:

·         Common Core Literacy—what does it mean?

·         The Three Shifts

·         Vocabulary development

·         Text Dependent Responses

·         Essential Questions


For over twenty-five years, John Harmon served as the Humanities Curriculum Coordinator for the Skaneateles School District.  He helped lead this district on its path to becoming one of the premiere districts in the state.

He is one of the longest serving members of the Board of Directors of the New York State English Council, as well as of the National Council of Teachers of English.  This professional service brought him in contact with NYSED, where he was frequently recruited to write standards and assessments.  For example, he co-chaired the ELA content workgroup that revised the ELA standards in advance of the Common Core.  Most recently, he chaired the committee that wrote the additional 15% that each state was allowed to add to the Common Core Standards.  

Currently, he travels throughout the state, working with schools on developing best practices in ELA and social studies. 

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Jill Robinson,
Feb 29, 2016, 10:40 AM